Wednesday, December 26, 2007

Sixty percent of executions happen in Texas

In reading the New York Time's article, U.S. Disparity in Executions Grows as Texas Bucks Trend, it's made pretty clear that there have not really been more executions this year in Texas in their criminal system, it's remained fairly constant with around 23 inmates each year being given the death penalty but what has changed is other states have reduced the numbers of those who are being given the death penalty.

It would have been helpful to have cited the numbers of how many murders happen in each state, but that was not a part of the article. According to this in 2006 1,384 murders were committed in Texas which was a drop from 2005, 26 prison inmates were put to death in 2007. In looking at some of the other states listed in the New York Times article where the death penalty was used in Oklahoma, 207 murders in 2006 and three death sentences carried out in 2007, Ohio had two death penalty sentences carried out in 2007 and 539 murders reported in 2006. According to the ACLU there are 3,300 people on death row in the United States, 190 of them here in Ohio. More detailed information as to those who were executed in 2007 can be found here with information such as the race of the inmate, the number of victims and the race of the victims.

3 comments:

Cyberseaer said...

Yup, and NJ is one state that has banned the death penalty. Not that it matter much, there hasn't been an excution in NJ since the 60s. Now that this "enlighten" thinking governor has banned the death penalty watch the number of murder victims rise. Another great choice for governor. First he bullies the state congress to up the sales tax one percent and now robs victims families' of closure and justice.

Is Ohio a nice place?

Lisa Renee said...

I think Ohio is a nice place but the murder rate has actually gone down in most places even those who don't use the death penalty that often. I'm not really sure how much of a deterrent it is, evidently it doesn't work in Texas given the number of executions they have there compared to most other states.

It appears most murder cases don't even end up with a death penalty being considered. Then most of those that are death penalty cases end up spending so much time in appeals with the increased cost being so much more than life in prison without parole. Though if I was a murderer, I'd probably rather die than spend 30 to 40 years in prison until I died a natural death. Some have actually volunteered to end the appeals process so they could be sentenced to death, maybe that's the way to do it, to offer all of those incarcerated for life without parole the chance to either have life in prison with no parole until they die a natural death or die by the death penalty sooner.

TawniAline said...

I just took a class on indiana homicides this past semester in college- i found it quite interesting that while the overall murder rate has decreased slightly over recent years the indiana rate has remained steady and even climbed in some years to match that of the national rates-- and some minority classes are even less "safe" in indiana versus the nation as a whole-- we have a few cases that probably deserved the penalty more than others that recieved it where the perpetrators walked free quite early on in their sentences (Silvia Likens for example)-- at any rate- regardless of how heinous the crime- it has been shown time and time again that the death penalty does not deter criminals from committing murders- its purpose is soley vengeance and the thought of giving them the choice begs the question of the sanity of the individual that chooses to expedite the death penalty early on-- though- as the mother of Shanda Sharer put nicely- the greatest punishment a victim's family could really wish for is for the killer to rot behind bars forever remembering the torturous screams of their victim(s)... and yes.. it is exponentially more expensive to execute than it is to sustain lifetime imprisonment sentences...