Saturday, September 20, 2008

Cline says Pelosi and Reid blew it...

There has not been much focus on Congress, beyond the official Democratic Party line that the reason why Democrats have not accomplished more as promised in 2006 was that there was not a large enough majority. Many of the initial promises made though that could have happened even without that majority did not happen, such as working more than the previous Republican Legislature...For the most part Democrats have been very successful in creating the public impression during the election season that President Bush is to blame for it all, that they have no responsibility in any of what's happening.

It does not appear that everyone is buying that though, as Andrew Cline points out, he thinks part of the reason why is:
A Gallup poll out this week is revealing. It found that only 47 percent of Americans say they have trust in the legislative branch of the federal government. That's the first time that number has dipped below 50 percent since Gallup began asking that question in 1972. The same poll found that only 18 percent of Americans approve of the job Congress is doing vs. 31 percent who approve of the job President Bush is doing.

There is good reason for those low ratings. When voters swept Democrats into power two years ago, they expected that the party would deliver on its promises. It hasn't. Instead of leadership and statesmanship, we got gamesmanship. Instead of governing, Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid embarked on a two-year political campaign.

While I can't say I agree with him that nothing was accomplished, the first 100 days of when Democrats were in power showed some promise, this next statement is worth sharing:
This election year should have produced a Democratic sweep of historic proportions, delivering the White House and massive majorities in the House and Senate. But thanks to the incompetence of Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid, Republicans might pull a respectable showing.

13 comments:

The News Writer said...

Both parties deserve blame here. In the Senate, the Republicans regularly deployed the filibuster to block any and virtually all measures the Dems tried to move through. What the Dems didn't do -- in the Senate -- was stand up and MAKE them carry through with their filibuster threat. All the GOP had to do was say they'd do it and Harry Reid would cave, thus preventing the spectacle of actually seeing Republicans block Democratic programs. And in some cases (can you say FISA?) they actually went ahead and went along with the GOP.

Lisa Renee said...

I agree with you 100% that both parties are to blame. In a way it seems to speak to how little many know about how our government is supposed to work when both presidential campaigns, as those in history have as well, continue to promise things that a President can't do without Congress.

The current system of government has been broken for some time, and until those on both sides who are sent to Washington represent us as they are supposed to rather than their political party first? I don't see things improving no matter who wins in November.

The News Writer said...

I agree and disagree on that point. There are some things a president can do (appointing supreme court justices for example) that will be substantially different depending on who is elected. the confirmation process, however, would still be subject to the filibuster crap.

plus bush and company have left us with an imperial presidency. i don't much trust anybody in that position, quite frankly, but i'm slightly more askeered of john "bomb bomb bomb bomb bomb iran" mccain than barack obama, and i'm utterly terrified of Sarah Palin, who would most likely become president before the end of a McCain term. we've already had 8 years of total incompetence. I don't think I handle any more. my heart won't take it. heheheh.

Lisa Renee said...

The concept of the imperial presidency is also one where Congress is to blame. Our system was set up designed with checks and balances in place, for any one part to have more power than the other two means, two parts of the system also failed to allow it.

The Court appointment issue beyond the politicization of the fear abortion would be made illegal is not one that has been a real campaign issue. It can have an impact, as we've seen with the current court being more pro-government and pro-business than it could be said pro-citizen. The court is another part of the process that escapes attention all too often as well.

I think your heart might have to take it, since it appears this election is going to be close, if Obama does not win, historians will probably point to his decision to not pick Clinton as to what created the whole Palin scenario that re-energized the Republican base on top of some of the things Cline suggested.

With the exception of those I know who are really into the whole partisan hatred theme, most average Americans don't think highly of Congress and with good reason. They may get a skate on how much blame they should get in the over all picture, but they are also not getting a great deal of kudo's either.

It makes me go back to what Washington said about what would happen to our country if we let party politics take hold. He was right...

Lisa Renee said...

That's why I think the reformer message (real or imagined) is working for McCain better than Obama's message of hope.

People are tired of politicians, most will tell you they want reform but they won't create the easiest way to get reform, throw out the incumbents...

The News Writer said...

"They [political parties] serve to organize faction, to give it an artificial and extraordinary force; to put, in the place of the delegated will of the nation, the will of a party, often a small but artful and enterprising minority of the community; and, according to the alternate triumphs of different parties, to make the public administration the mirror of the ill-concerted and incongruous projects of faction, rather than the organ of consistent and wholesome plans digested by common counsels, and modified by mutual interests.

"However combinations or associations of the above description may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely, in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people, and to usurp for themselves the reins of government; destroying afterwards the very engines, which have lifted them to unjust dominion."


I think we ignore potential Supreme Court appointees at our peril -- and for many more reasons than abortion. It really should be more of an issue, but I suppose it's just too arcane for the "average" American to consider. Pity.

And I agree that Congress has fallen asleep at the wheel these past seven years. Well, let's say these past two years when those other than Bush lackeys have been in charge. And honestly, that really ticks me off.

But throwing out the incumbents rarely gets us any real change either. Just a different bunch of politicians, with a lot less experience. Makes you long for the days of the citizen legislator, when the senators and representatives had real careers instead of power mad schemes.

And yes, this election will be close. Obama's choice of Biden instead of Clinton may be one of many causes, if he does lose (as I suspect he will), but there are many more -- the sheep-like quality of much of the American electorate, decades of Republican twisting the fabric of reality into unrecognizable knots, decades of Democratic acquiescence, racism, a weak Democratic candidate, bad journalism. I could go on, but now I'm depressing myself again.

Our first president again: "Truth will ultimately prevail where there is pains to bring it to light. "

Lisa Renee said...

I think you just nailed where the source of my hope and idealism still exists:

I long for the days of the citizen legislator, when the senators and representatives had real careers instead of power mad schemes.

It's clear for almost all once they are in power too long even if they went with the best intentions, they become corrupt.

Anonymous said...

After reading this exchange, I think we should return to a a country where only property owners can vote. I know Lisa is not a property owner, and I'm tired of people like her looking for a handout. Oh wait, that sounds too republican. Oh wait, the government is bailing out international banks. Now that's a neo-conservative policy. STOP IT WITH YOUR POLITICS OF GENDER. WE ARE IN CRISIS. DO YOU NOT GET IT YOU FUCKING MORON. THIS IS BIGGER THAN YOU.

Kurt

Lisa Renee said...

I have a feeling you'll be emailing me another apology...It'd be nice if you'd actually read before you post Kurt. Not very professional at all...

The News Writer said...

Lisa, you may have to email me an explanation -- I'm a bit dense this morning!

Lisa Renee said...

Kurt is one of my "fan club" every so often he stops by, insults me, most times not even relevant to what the post is about.

Then? He later emails me to apologize. Believe it or not? He's a lawyer here in Toledo and we used to be friends.

The News Writer said...

Ah. Thanks. I thought I was missing something. Lack of coffee and all that.

By the way, glad you like the new design -- personally, I really love it. It is so me.

Lisa Renee said...

That's one thing I love about wordpress compared to blogger is the template options.

I tried to change my template at Glass City but too many people complained and wanted it to stay the way they knew it. So, I play around with them on my smaller blogs that don't generate that much traffic.

I do really love your new look, I agree it is you.

:-)