Thursday, March 23, 2006

It's Thursday! Time to share some link love and...

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa (AP) -- Three impoverished South African women, whose father wrote "The Lion Sleeps Tonight," have won a six-year battle for royalties in a landmark case that could affect musicians worldwide.

So, you can watch this video and hear a version of the song, or go to Wiki for more information on the song...






Or....share some link love as OTA members know how to do...Don't know what that is? Don't worry...journey over to The Crazy Rants of Samantha Burns where answers not lions or tigers or bears await you.

:-)

Comedian Jenee: People are Idiots joins in Cybergeek Stuff

I’m now an official member of the Open Trackback Alliance (keep reading- it’s even geekier than it sounds). What that means is every Friday I will publish a post that anybody can trackback to with their own post and...


Pirate's Cove shares Hasta La Vista Rabitt

Isn’t he cute? Everyone go “awwwwww, what a sweety.” Except in St. Paul, Minn (h/t to Stop the ACLU, original story at the Junkyard Blog)
The Easter Bunny has been sent packing at St. Paul City Hall.
A toy rabbit, pastel-colored egg...


David over at Third World County gives us WOOT!

Rick, The Real Ugly American, has stolen a beat! See his interview with FRED BARNES…

7 comments:

T. F. Stern said...

Not having read the court documents I am unfamiliar with the court case; however, my gut reaction would be toward the original rights of the author, the creative agent. I would be curious, at least to some degree, on whether the song and associated lyrics were original or the result of long established tribal culture. In either event, the author should retain royaly rights and get paid for the efforts which so many enjoy, no different than any other song writer.

Back when Napster was a big deal among my kids I explained this thought process to them, asking if it was right to make "free" copies of copywited material to bypass payment to the rightful agent. Just because you can do it doesn't mean you should do it. Pay the bill and enjoy your songs.

Lisa Renee said...

TF, According to Wiki:

The song was first recorded by its writer, Solomon Linda, and his group, The Evening Birds, in 1939 under the title "Mbube" (Zulu for "lion"). Gallo Studios paid Linda a single fee for the recording and no royalties. "Mbube" became a hit throughout South Africa and sold about one hundred thousand copies during the 1940s. The song became so popular it lent its name to a style of African a capella music. Solomon Linda later died in poverty.

As to the "free" downloads? I agree while they may seem free they are taking profits from someone who created the material. We typically use a pay service or download music directly from an artists site with their permission. It makes it easier. I know if someone took my book that I worked very hard to write and copied it, I'd not be a happy camper.

:-)

Me4Prez said...

Do you use Technorati or Haloscan for trackbacks. I checked out TCROSB and was thinking about seeing if she will accept me. I don't see why she wouldn't since I don't believe in splitting families of peas up.

Lisa Renee said...

I use haloscan for trackbacks, she doesn't care which program you use as long as you have one. The downside to it is I have to manually add the trackbacks into a post but it's not that bad and it's worth it.

I think she'd accept you too, Sam's pretty cool.

:-)

Me4Prez said...

I will look into it. I think I can do either technorati or haloscan.

Lisa Renee said...

Haloscan was kind of tricky for me to set up because I don't use haloscan for comments, you do so it will be easier for you.

:-)

Stephanie said...

I still haven't figured out Haloscan, but I haven't been able to put much effort into it yet. Despite the occasional prods from one of my readers.

As far as the copy rights go, (myself also being unfamiliar with this particular case) it really depends on what the artist in question sells off. From the blurb you posted, Lisa, Solomon Linda sold off his rights for a pittance, stupid but legal. If you sell all of your rights off for the guaranteed payment, versus the "risk" of the royalty the company is taking the bigger risk and thus entitled to the bigger rewards. While I'd advise against the move on the part of the artist, doing so is their choice. As long as their choice was an informed decision, than there should be no further legal consequences for either party as long as the contract is legal and followed as per its intentions.